Pull Yourself Up a Chair

Fourth Letter Page 1

Fourth Letter Page 1

 

Fourth Letter Page 2

 

Fourth Letter Page 3

 

Charles’ wit showed up in the most interesting places in his letter. He wrote his feelings much more honestly than he spoke when it came to sharing his thoughts with Olevia. The evening of November 4, 1943 brought a level of happiness into Charles’ heart he had never felt before. Nothing came close to it. Giddiness filled his entire body, so much so that he couldn’t sleep. Love had found its way into his soul.

Oh, how he hated to leave Olevia at the train station again. A place of joyful meeting and sad departing, the Boise Depot created mixed feelings in his gut. The Depot, where he had proposed to her as soon as he got off the train the night before and where she had said the one word he longed to hear, would forever be etched in his mind and life.

Goodbye came too quickly the following morning. Once they waved farewell and he got settled on the train, Charles wanted to tell everyone the news so the rest of the passengers could share in his overflowing joyful energy of having found the love of his life!

“Olevia said, ‘Yes!’ Do you hear? She said, ‘Yes!'”

Everyone on the train would applaud and holler, “Yeah!” Some of the men would pump their own fist in the air and then shake his hand and congratulate him. Others would slap him on the back with friendly affirmations. Some of the women would clap and nod and get a little misty-eyed for Charles and his new fiance’. Everyone would share in his happiness. The train ride went quickly that day. He only wished Olevia could have been with him so he could introduce her to every single passenger and afterward snuggle in the seat with her and wrap her in his loving arms and never let go.

Wasn’t it ironic how the war that had brought them together in the first place was the very thing that once again separated them from each other. Why did it have to be that way? Damn!

Since he couldn’t be with her right then, he chose instead to write to his soon-to-be wife about what love meant to him and how happy Olevia had made him. Today could not have been any better. Halfway between Ogden and Salt Lake City was when he settled down enough to write.

This was the fourth letter from Charles to Olevia and the first time he spelled her first name correctly. No doubt that subject was part of the conversation before she said, “Yes!”

How About a Date Friday Night?

Telegram

 

 

 

 

Charles waited for weeks as time dragged so slowly it probably felt more like years. Where was a letter from Olevia? Why hadn’t he got it yet? Having heard nary a word from her, he decided it was time to take action, to take a furlough to find out in person, face to face, why she hadn’t mailed a letter or sent a telegram. He couldn’t even connect with her on the telephone. Was she avoiding him? Had something happened?

 

He couldn’t wait another minute to find out if the woman that he loved with all of his heart loved him back. Surely she had told him something that made him believe she loved him or he would not have put his heart on the line like he did for her in his previous letters. All he wanted now was an answer, one way or another. By this time on Friday evening he would be in Boise and be able to speak with Olevia. Friday couldn’t come quick enough for him now.

 

Charles made it his mission to exhaust every possibility before giving up hope. Once he made his mind up there was no changing it. He would take the 300 mile trip by train from Wendover. He hoped Olevia would be at the other end at the Boise Depot to pick him up. If he didn’t see her there when his train pulled into the station, he would walk if he had to in order to get to Olevia’s home and see her face to face. Nothing would hold him back from getting an answer. He hoped it was the answer he wished for, but Charles was a realist and didn’t dare get his hopes up too high. He knew better than that. He had more life experience at twenty-six than most people would see in their lifetime. He prepared himself for the worst while expecting the best.

 

The train ride allowed his full attention to plan for an unknown future. As Charles thought about a future with Olevia a smile came to his face and made his heart feel lighter. He liked the idea of them settling down together and creating a home for their future family. He had time to think about the future without Olevia too. He would manage without her and be all right but he would never meet another woman like her. He knew that completely. This was the one woman who had entered his life through his dreams and settled into his heart from the moment they met.

 

 

 

I Would Wade Hell’s Fire

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Who was the young man was who went AWOL and where did he end up? Why he left Wendover Field in the first place is a mystery along with why he joined the Army Air Corp. What did he think the Army was going to be like?

Jones and Peggy had just gotten married and Wesley and Carol were already engaged. Though the letter didn’t say it specifically, the “proposition we talked over in front of the depot at Boise” sounded very much like a marriage proposal. Charles was making plans for his future in the Army Air Corp and hopefully a future with Olevia. Perhaps the commission would have given him the opportunity to transfer back to Gowen Field. He now considered Boise his home and very much wanted to be there.

Charles had put his heart on the line in this letter, hoping the woman he had fallen head over heels over would give him a chance. What more could he have done? This might have been the last letter he would send to Olevia. Time seemed to drag waiting for her reply. How could he stand the waiting? Why hadn’t she replied? Had her letter been lost in the mail or had she decided she didn’t love Charles after all? All the possible scenarios played over and over in Charles’ head like a needle getting stuck in a groove on a record in a record player. He loved music but this particular song was wearing him down.

Westbrook Genealogy Update

Family Tree photo by Patricia Westbrook

A phone conversation with my sister turned up a connection to my cousin, whom I had never met. I emailed him and found out that he had a copy of the Westbrook genealogy that went back to James Westbrook who was born in 1653 in England, who emigrated 13 Oct 1697 to America, and died 11 Jun 1717 in Henrico County, Virginia or Isle of Wight County, Virginia. James was married to Elizabeth Puckett 3 Jan 1697. Elizabeth was born 1670 Isle of Wight County, Virginia and her father was William Puckett. I had not researched any of the family history, so I assumed it was accurate. It was fascinating perusing the names and locations of my people and I wished I knew more about them. I wanted to know their stories. I loved stories about real people. As luck would have it, I was in for a pleasant surprise.

In my correspondence with my cousin, he forwarded me a copy of a book that my aunt wrote in 1990. He typed it up for her. It included her stories of growing up in a hardworking farming family. How exciting it was to know this book existed! I also had the opportunity to meet my cousin just last week, on the 4th of July. He and his lady came to visit on their trip around the state of Florida and they decided to stop by. I had a great time learning about their lives and hearing about both of their families.

Now thoroughly enjoying reading my aunt’s stories, I am learning more about my father, Charles Westbrook, his sisters and brothers, and his parents. I am so thrilled that my aunt took the time to share her stories. It’s the stories that connect us to our roots. These stories ground us and guide us in the direction of our dreams for the future. Stories express who we are and what we believe in. I’m very excited to share what has occurred over the last few weeks because of my original request for information on family. This is opening a door that I never realized I wanted to see the other side of. It seems to be drawing me in like a magnet. I wonder if James Westbrook had any stories.

About Dad’s Letters

As I sorted through the letters, put them in date order and began reading them, the words absorbed my very soul. A mirage began to take shape of a life that seemed as real as if I’d been there.

Dad’s letters have been safely tucked away for over 60 years, stored on the top shelf of Mom’s bedroom closet where they have remained safe. The letters have been protected as if they were treasures. They are. I have become the keeper of the letters and feel a responsibility to create a book out of them for family, historians, WWII buffs, interested readers and future generations. They provide a portal into the lives of my parents during their young adult life when our world was at war for the second time. Dad’s written words give insight into who he was and where he came from.

Originally from Steens, Mississippi, dad joined the Mississippi Army National Guard in 1934. Two years later he was called upon to help clean up the aftermath from a devastating tornado that hit Tupelo, Mississippi on the evening of April 5, 1936. In 1939 Dad enlisted in the Army Air Corp and worked on the Tennessee Valley Authority Electrical Installation. In 1940 Dad was transferred to Guatemala and was chosen to go on a Good Will tour of South America. He was later transferred to Panama where he met Wesley Lyons who was also in the Army Air Corp which would later become the Air Force.

Wesley was from Boise, Idaho. They became fast friends and ended up being transferred to Gowen Field in Boise in May, 1943. Wesley’s girlfriend, Carol Howry, was best friends with Mom. Wesley introduced Dad to Mom at Carol’s home in June, 1943.

Two months later Dad was transferred to Wendover Field in Wendover, Utah. At that point is where these letters began.

Looking for Westbrook Family Members

Are there any Westbrook family members who are willing to fill in some history about our family? I’m looking for relatives of my grandparents Wesley Arnold Westbrook and Lillian Adena (Thomas) Westbrook from Steens, Mississippi.

About My Book

In my possession are approximately 150 letters written by my father to my mother during WWII. He was in the Army Air Corp which became the Air Force. I am writing a book about the letters.

Dad was quite a letter writer and had some interesting ways to explain what was going on in his life and the world at that time. One example is his description of snowmelt on the mountains. He described them as bearded men who were getting a shave.

My intention is to include much of what he wrote along with my comments.